GEAR 306 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Hollywood Cinema
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEAR 306
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to enable students to develop a general knowledge of Hollywood's production/distribution/exhibition networks. It identifies main themes and styles throughout Hollywood's history and discusses its patterns of authorship, star system, technology and genres. The course contextualizes Hollywood as a global system not only as a business but also as a system of meanings.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Define key concepts in film studies and their reflections on Hollywood cinema.
  • Evaluate Hollywood as a system of meanings, film industry and entertainment business.
  • Elaborate upon the history of Hollywood cinema as well as the methods and ideological issues related to the historical and cultural research in film and media studies in general.
  • Analyze the heterogeneity of Hollywood cinema with its various genres and approaches.
  • Define Hollywood’s star system, key studios, directors and its relation to other media.
  • Elaborate upon Hollywood’s complex relationship to key social and economic crises, cultural shifts and technological developments.
  • Critically analyze the tensions between art cinema and Hollywood cinema as well as various influences of Hollywood cinema on other cinemas.
  • Critically analyze individual Hollywood films from different periods and genres, while also compare different films from a diversity of genres and periods.
Course Content This course examines Hollywood in its economic, cultural and historical context. It studies its industrial dynamics (studio system, star system, etc.) in parallel with its narrative tendencies and stylistic devices. Students are expected to prepare papers analyzing Hollywood's systems in relation to its products and production processes.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the Course
2 The Silent Period and the Sound Era - Screening: Modern Times (Charlie Chaplin, 1936) Gomery, D, The Coming of Sound: A History. New York & London: Routledge, 1980. 87-115
3 Genres I: Melodrama - Screening: All About Eve (Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1950) Neale, S, Genre and Hollywood. London & New York: Routledge, 2000. 179-205.
4 Genres II: Film Noir - Screening: Mildred Pierce (Michael Curtiz, 1945) Naremore, J. (2008). More than night: Film noir in its contexts. University of California Press. 167-220.
5 Genres III: Psycho-Biddy - Screening: What Ever Happened To Baby Jane? (Robert Aldrich, 1962) R. M. Hodgens, What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? Film Quarterly, Vol. 16, No. 3 (Spring, 1963), pp. 60-61
6 The Production Code and Studios - Screening: Feud (Ryan Murphy, 2017) Bordwell, D., Staiger, J., & Thompson, K, The classical Hollywood cinema: Film style and mode of production to1960. Columbia University Press, 1985. 1-70.
7 Genres IV: Western - Screening: The Quick and the Dead (Sam Raimi, 1995) Bönke, M. (2001) “Myth and law in the films of John Ford” Journal of Law and Society vol. 28 (1), 47-63.
8 New Hollywood - Screening: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf (Mike Nichols, 1966) - First response paper due date Tzioumakis, Y. (2006). The New Hollywood and the Independent Hollywood in American Independent Cinema: An Introduction (Rutgers, pp. 169-191.
9 Authorship - Screening: Kill Bill Vol. 1 (Quentin Tarantino, 2003) Spadoni, R. (1995). Geniuses of the systems: Authorship and evidence in classical Hollywood cinema. Film History, 7(4), 362-385.
10 Contemporary Hollywood - Screening: Scream (Wes Craven, 1996) Neale, S., & Smith, M. (Eds.). (2013). Contemporary Hollywood Cinema. London and New York: Routledge. 280-294
11 Hollywood, Internet and Found Footage - Screening: The Taking of Deborah Logan (Adam Robitel, 2014) - Second Response Paper Due date Bordwell, D. (2002). Intensified Continuity: Visual Style in Contemporary American Film, Film Quarterly. 55 (3), pp. 16-28.
12 Stardom - Screening: Hunger Games (Gary Ross, 2012) Mulvey, L. (1989). Visual pleasure and narrative cinema. In Visual and other pleasures. Palgrave Macmillan UK, pp. 14-26.
13 Pixar, Disney and the Digital Era - Screening: Maleficent (Robert Stromberg, 2014) Watts, S. (1995). Walt Disney: Art and politics in the American century. The Journal of American History. 82 (1), pp. 84-110. - Currah, A. (2007) “Hollywood, the Internet and the world: A geography of disruptive innovation” Industry and Innovation. 14 (4), pp. 359-384.
14 New Cinema of Attractions? Re-make and Reboot - Screening: Spiderman: Homecoming (Jon Watts, 2017) - Third response paper due date Behlil, M. (2016). Hollywood is Everywhere: Global Directors in the Blockbuster Era. Amsterdam University Press. 97-111.
15 Review of the semester
16 Review of the semester

 

Course Textbooks
References

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
25
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
3
75
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
4
100
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
3
23
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
117

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to scientifically examine concepts and ideas in the field of sociology; to be able to interpret and evaluate data.
2 To be able to define classical and contemporary theories in sociology; to be able to identify the differences and similarities among those theories and to be able to evaluate them.
3 To be able to critically use the knowledge acquired in the field of sociology
4 To be able to plan and conduct, individually or as a member of a team, an entire sociological research process with the knowledge of methodological requirements of the field.
5 To be able to identify and evaluate local, regional and global issues and problems.
6 To be able to share their ideas and solutions supplemented by qualitative and quantitative data in written and oral forms.
7 To be able to make use of other disciplines related to sociology and to have core knowledge related to those disciplines.
8 To be able to follow developments in sociology and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
9 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To have social and scholarly values and ethical principles during the collection and interpretation of data for implementation, publication, dissemination, and maintenance
12 To acquire life long learning abilities that will enable the socially responsible application of knowledge based on their field of study to their professional and everyday lives.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest