GEAR 306 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Hollywood Cinema
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEAR 306
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to enable students to develop a general knowledge of Hollywood's production/distribution/exhibition networks. It identifies main themes and styles throughout Hollywood's history and discusses its patterns of authorship, star system, technology and genres. The course contextualizes Hollywood as a global system not only as a business but also as a system of meanings.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts in film studies and their reflections on Hollywood cinema
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the heterogeneity of Hollywood cinema with its various genres and approaches.
  • Understand of Hollywood’s star system, key studios, directors and its relation to other media.
  • Understand Hollywood’s complex relationship to key social and economic crises, cultural shifts and technological developments.
  • Critically analyze individual Hollywood films from different periods and genres with a focus on Neo-Noir, while also comparing different films from a diversity of genres and periods.
Course Content This course examines Hollywood in its economic, cultural and historical context. It studies its industrial dynamics (studio system, star system, etc.) in parallel with its narrative tendencies and stylistic devices. Students are expected to attend the lectures, watch the films and actively participate with the class discussion following each screening.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the Course
2 Birth of a Nation (excerpts) D.W. Griffth, 1915 Brody, R., “The Worst Thing About Birth of a Nation is How Good it Is”, The New Yorker, February 1, 2013.
3 Citizen Kane, Orson Welles, 1941 Bordwell and Thompson, 112-153.
4 The Birds, Alfred Hitchcock,1963 Paglia, C.,The Birds, British Film Institute, 1998.
5 The Graduate, Mike Nichols, 1967 Menne, J., The Cinema of Defection: Auteur Theory and Institutional Life, Representations, Vol. 114, No. 1 (Spring 2011), pp. 36-64
6 Badlands, Terrence Malick, 1973 Excerpts from Taxi Driver, Martin Scorsese, 1976 and 2001 A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick, 1968 Danks, A., Death Comes as an End: Temporality, Domesticity and Photography in Terrence Malick’s Badlands, CTEQ Annotations No.1, 1998, in Metro 113/114, 1998.
7 One Flew Over the Cockoo’s Nest, Milos Forman, 1975 Farber, S., Americana, Sweet and Sour, The Hudson Review, Vol. 29, No. 1 (Spring, 1976), pp. 95-102.
8 Bladerunner, Ridley Scott, 1982 Barad, J., Blade Runner and Sartre, The Philosophy of Neo-Noir, 2007 The University Press of Kentucky.
9 Pulp Fiction, Quentin Tarantino, 1994 Spadoni, R., Geniuses of the systems: Authorship and Evidence in Classical Hollywood Cinema. Film History, 7(4), 362-385.
10 The Big Lebowski, Joel and Ethan Coen, 1998 Hibbs, T.S., The Human Comedy Perpetuates Itself: Nihiliism and Comedy in Coen Neo-Noir, The Philosophy of Neo-Noir, 2007 The University Press of Kentucky.
11 Fight Club, David Fincher, 1999 Henderson, G. L. Worlds of Trash Capitalism, Cultural Geographies, Vol. 18, No. 2 (April 2011), pp. 143-170.
12 The Dark Knight, Christopher Nolan, 2008 Ney, J., Dark Roots: Christopher Nolan and Noir, FilmNoirFoundation.org Noir City, Summer 2013.
13 Drive, Nicolas Winding Refn, 2011 Mongin, O., From Taxi Driver to Drive: A Perfect Ride in Los Angeles, Esprit, No. 381 (1) (January 2012), pp. 43-48.
14 Thoroughbreds, Cory Finley, 2017 Chang, J., Cory Finley's 'Thoroughbreds' is a Delectably Twisted Mean-Girls Noir, The Los Angeles Times, March 8, 2018.
15 Course Review
16 Final Exam

 

Course Textbooks
References

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
20
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
1
30
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
4
100
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
15
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
25
Final / Oral Exam
1
29
    Total
117

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to scientifically examine concepts and ideas in the field of sociology; to be able to interpret and evaluate data.
2 To be able to define classical and contemporary theories in sociology; to be able to identify the differences and similarities among those theories and to be able to evaluate them.
3 To be able to critically use the knowledge acquired in the field of sociology
4 To be able to plan and conduct, individually or as a member of a team, an entire sociological research process with the knowledge of methodological requirements of the field.
5 To be able to identify and evaluate local, regional and global issues and problems.
6 To be able to share their ideas and solutions supplemented by qualitative and quantitative data in written and oral forms.
7 To be able to make use of other disciplines related to sociology and to have core knowledge related to those disciplines.
8 To be able to follow developments in sociology and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
9 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To have social and scholarly values and ethical principles during the collection and interpretation of data for implementation, publication, dissemination, and maintenance
12 To acquire life long learning abilities that will enable the socially responsible application of knowledge based on their field of study to their professional and everyday lives.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest