GEAR 309 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Film Seminar: A Cinema in the Shade I
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEAR 309
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to introduce students to films that have an important place in film history and yet have low visibility in the framework of commercial cinema, and to enable the students to acquire film culture.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • describe the significant works of cinema in general
  • discuss the films they will see
  • classify films in cinema history
  • compare films in their relation to the structure of the cinematic institution that produced them
  • analyze these works in the context of their socio-cultural milieu
  • contrast cinematic traditions in terms of narrative, technique, authorial styles
Course Content This is the first of a series of courses, introducing and screening films crucial to forming film culture and not readily available elsewhere. The course includes canonic, experimental, avant-garde (commercial or non-commercial) examples of early cinema, American studio films, European art films, world cinema.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction Pages 6-13 from NOWELL-SMITH, G. (1999). The Oxford history of world cinema: [the definitive history of cinema worldwide]. Oxford [u.a.], Oxford Univ. Pr.
2 Birth of Cinema — between art and entertainment Excerpts from Lumiere Brothers George Melies - Voyage to the Moon Thomas Edison - The Great Train Robbery Pages 13-23 from NOWELL-SMITH, G. (1999). The Oxford history of world cinema: [the definitive history of cinema worldwide]. Oxford [u.a.], Oxford Univ. Pr.
3 Early Cinema — between documentary and fiction Robert J. Flaherty - Nanook of the North (1922) Pages 86-91 from NOWELL-SMITH, G. (1999). The Oxford history of world cinema: [the definitive history of cinema worldwide]. Oxford [u.a.], Oxford Univ. Pr.
4 Russian Constructivism Dziga Vertov, The Man with the Movie Camera (1929) Pages 92-94 from NOWELL-SMITH, G. (1999). The Oxford history of world cinema: [the definitive history of cinema worldwide]. Oxford [u.a.], Oxford Univ. Pr.
5 Surrealism in Cinema Luis Buñuel - L'Age d'Or (1930) (60 min) Luis Buñuel - Un Chien Andalou (1929) (21 min) Tony Richardson “The films of Luis Bunuel” Sight and Sound; Jan 1, 1954; 23, 3; pg. 125.
6 European Cinema between the world wars Jean Vigo - Zéro de conduite (1933) (41 min) Gyula Zilzer “Remembrances of Jean Vigo” Hollywood Quarterly, Vol. 3, No. 2 (Winter, 1947-1948), pp. 125-128.
7 Italian Neo-Realism Vittorio de Sica - Ladri di biciclette (1948) (93 min) Richard Winnington, “Bicycle Thieves” Sight and Sound; Mar 1, 1950; 19, 1; pg. 26.
8 Nouvelle Vague Jean-Luc Godard – À bout de soufflé (1960) (90 min) Roger Ebert on Godard’s Breathless (http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-breathless-1960)
9 Midterm
10 Cinema Verité Chris Marker - La Joli Mai (1963) (145 min) Peter Graham „On Cinema Verite in France” Film Quarterly, Vol. 17, No. 4 (Summer, 1964), pp. 30-36.
11 British New Wave Lindsay Anderson - If (1968) (111 min) Robinson, David “Anderson shooting IF...” Sight and Sound; Summer 1968; 37, 3; pg. 130.
12 New German Cinema Wim Wenders - Wings of Desire (1987) (128 min) Makhmalbaf, Mohsan “Obsession” Sight and Sound; Sep 1, 1995; 5, 9; pg. 40.
13 Road Movies Wim Wenders - Alice in the Cities (1974) (110 min) John Pym “The Road from Wuppertal” Sight and Sound; Fall 1984; 53, 4; pg. 244.
14 Unhollywood - American Independent Cinema Jim Jarmusch - Stranger than Paradise (1984) (89 min) Richard Linnett “As American as You Are: Jim Jarmusch and Stranger than Paradise” Cinéaste, Vol. 14, No. 1 (1985), pp. 26-28.
15 Review of the semester
16 Final Paper Submission

 

Course Textbooks
References

NOWELL-SMITH, G. (1999). The Oxford history of world cinema: [the definitive history of cinema worldwide]. Oxford [u.a.], Oxford Univ. Pr.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
35
Final / Oral Exam
1
45
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
2
55
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
1
45
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
15
Final / Oral Exam
1
25
    Total
120

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to scientifically examine concepts and ideas in the field of sociology; to be able to interpret and evaluate data.
2 To be able to define classical and contemporary theories in sociology; to be able to identify the differences and similarities among those theories and to be able to evaluate them.
3 To be able to critically use the knowledge acquired in the field of sociology
4 To be able to plan and conduct, individually or as a member of a team, an entire sociological research process with the knowledge of methodological requirements of the field.
5 To be able to identify and evaluate local, regional and global issues and problems.
6 To be able to share their ideas and solutions supplemented by qualitative and quantitative data in written and oral forms.
7 To be able to make use of other disciplines related to sociology and to have core knowledge related to those disciplines.
8 To be able to follow developments in sociology and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
9 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To have social and scholarly values and ethical principles during the collection and interpretation of data for implementation, publication, dissemination, and maintenance
12 To acquire life long learning abilities that will enable the socially responsible application of knowledge based on their field of study to their professional and everyday lives.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest