GEET 311 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Politics of Human Rights
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEET 311
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course is designed to introduce students with the development of human rights as a global phenomenon, an international legal regime transgressing state borders. Our aim is to explore certain questions pertaining to human rights: What is it that we call “human rights”? In what historical periods can we locate progress and expansion in human rights? What do human rights stand for/against? What does it mean to have human rights with a claim to universality? By giving priority to primary texts and documents on human rights, we will try to understand this historical, legal, and political concept both in theory and practice.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • to be able to explain political history of human rights
  • to be able to evaluate changes in human rights during the globalization process
  • to be able to explain use of child labor within the context of human rights violations
  • to be able to analyze climate change within the context of human rights violations
  • to be able to explain economic, social and political aspects of human rights in Turkey
Course Content Our course will proceed on the basis of three parts. In the first part, we will have a general introduction to the course, and will read the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948 adopted by the United Nations. In this part, we will also spend time on a broad yet somewhat nuanced enough trajectory of human rights. In so doing, we will try to diagnose and shed light upon certain keystones, radical shifts, and arguably progressive moments in historical development of conceptual, political and legal articulations of human rights. In the second part, we will focus on the early 20th century developments on human rights; such as the two world wars, the Nuremberg Trials, and the international recognition of “crimes against humanity” and genocide. We will spare our last few weeks on the decolonization period onwards. In this part we will discuss issues such as right to self-determination, child labor, migrant workers, and rights of persons with disabilities.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the course: Presentation and an overview of the course, course organization, requirements and methods of evaluation Sabine Carey et al. “The Concept of Human Rights,” in The Politics of Human Rights, pp. 7-39.
2 What is “politics of human rights”? Sabine C. Carey et al. “The Concept of Human Rights,” pp. 7-39. Universal Declaration of Human Rights, http://www.un.org/en/udhrbook/pdf/udhr_booklet_en_web.pdf.
3 Early Foundations: Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern State of Rights Jack Donnelly, Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice, pp. 81-92.
4 The Rights of Man and Citizen: American and French Revolutions “The Declaration of Independence” (1776) “Bill of Rights” (1791) “The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen” (1789)
5 Midterm I
6 “The Rights of Man and Citizen” I: American Revolution & American Civil WarHuman Rights in Early 20th Century: WWI & WWII UN Charter, Nuremberg Trials, Convention on Genocide (1948) European Convention on Human Rights (1950)
7 Torture and the Rights of the Prisoners of War Andrew Clapham, “The International Crime of Torture,” in Human Rights: A Very Short Introduction, pp. 81-95. Geneva Conventions (1949) UN Convention against Torture (1984)
8 Rights of Refugees UN Convention Relating to Status of Refugees (1951) Sabine C. Carey et al. The Politics of Human Rights, pp. 81-86.
9 Racial and Sexual Discrimination US Constitution, 13th-14th-15th Amendments Martin Luther King JR. “I Have A Dream” International Convention on Racial Discrimination (1965) International Convention on Discrimination against Women (1979)
10 Midterm II
11 Is Human Rights a Hegemonic Idea? Decolonization, Right to Self-Determination, and Twin Covenants Samuel Moyn, “Why Anticolonialism Wasn’t a Human Rights Movement,” in The Last Utopia, pp. 84-119. International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (1966) International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (1966)
12 Protection of Children, Migrant Workers, and Persons with Disabilities UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (1990) UN Convention on the Protection of the Rights of Migrant Workers and Their Families (1990) UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006)
13 Considering the Planet: Animal Rights and Green Movements Sue Donaldson / Will Kymlika, “Universal Basic Rights for Animals,” in Zoopolis, pp. 19-49.
14 Conclusions
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Textbooks
References

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
14
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
15
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
2
50
Final / Oral Exam
1
25
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
17
75
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
1
25
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
15
1
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
15
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
2
10
Final / Oral Exam
1
20
    Total
118

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to scientifically examine concepts and ideas in the field of sociology; to be able to interpret and evaluate data.
2 To be able to define classical and contemporary theories in sociology; to be able to identify the differences and similarities among those theories and to be able to evaluate them.
3 To be able to critically use the knowledge acquired in the field of sociology
4 To be able to plan and conduct, individually or as a member of a team, an entire sociological research process with the knowledge of methodological requirements of the field.
5 To be able to identify and evaluate local, regional and global issues and problems.
6 To be able to share their ideas and solutions supplemented by qualitative and quantitative data in written and oral forms.
7 To be able to make use of other disciplines related to sociology and to have core knowledge related to those disciplines.
8 To be able to follow developments in sociology and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
9 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To have social and scholarly values and ethical principles during the collection and interpretation of data for implementation, publication, dissemination, and maintenance
12 To acquire life long learning abilities that will enable the socially responsible application of knowledge based on their field of study to their professional and everyday lives.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest