SOC 202 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Contemporary Theories of Sociology
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
SOC 202
Spring
3
0
3
5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives To provide a thorough introduction to theoretical orientations in contemporary sociological theory, thereby providing the student with a solid grounding in the concepts, arguments, approaches and schools of thought indispensible for advanced work in sociology.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • will be able to understand and use the basic concepts of and theoretical orientations in contemporary sociological theory.
  • will be able to examine critically the lines of continuity (and discontinuity) with classical sociological theory in order to assess what change implies at the very level of theorizing about society.
  • will be able to evaluate a comprehensive range of arguments and thinkers that have been influential in social thought from roughly the second world war until the present: critical theory, phenomenology, exchange theory, Parsonian functionalism, symbolic interactionism, and poststructuralism.
  • will be able to distinguish between types of explanation and forms of synthesis used in the sociological study of human behavior: phenomenological, constructivism, normative-rational, historicist, structuralist, and functionalist.
  • will be able to assess the implications of factoring in class, race and gender not only for society as object of study, but also for theory-construction in sociology.
  • will be able to reflect critically on the possibility of agency for the human subject (as object of study) and the responsibility of the sociologist (as subject of study).
Course Content The course involves an introduction to and examination of the major theoretical orientations and types of explanation in sociology ranging (roughly) from the end of the second world war to the present. In particular, it aims to provide the student with a perspective from which to question the distinction between “classical” and “contemporary” in theory construction, to examine the relevance of theory to fieldwork, to assess the relative strengths of types of explanation, and to reflect on the implications of theory change and controversy in sociology.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction and overview of the course
2 Overview of Sociological Theories Elliott, A. 2014. Contemporary Social Theory, pp. 1-31.
3 Contemporary Relevance of the Classics Dillon, M. 2014. Introduction to Sociological Theory, pp. 117-150.
4 Structural Functionalism: Parsons & Merton Dillon, M. 2014. Introduction to Sociological Theory, pp. 155-182.
5 Symbolic Interactionism and the Sociology of Erving Goffman Johnson, D.P. Contemporary Sociological Theory, pp.109-136.
6 Conflict Theories: Weberian Tradition Wallace, R. & Wolf, A. 1995. Contemporary Sociological Theory, pp. 142-181.
7 MIDTERM
8 Neo-Marxism, Critical Theory Elliott, A. 2014. Contemporary Social Theory, pp. 40-142.
9 Contemporary Critical Theory: Habermas Elliott, A. 2014. Contemporary Social Theory, pp. 177-205.
10 Theorizing Sexuality, the Body and Power: Foucault Dillon, M. 2014. Introduction to Sociological Theory, ss. 369-392.
11 Theories of Structuration: Giddens and Bourdieu Elliott, A. 2014. Contemporary Social Theory, pp. 144-175.
12 Theories of Structuration: Giddens and Bourdieu II Elliott, A. 2014. Contemporary Social Theory, pp. 144-175.
13 Networks, Risks, Liquids: Bauman and Beck Elliott, A. 2014. Contemporary Social Theory, pp. 291-330.
14 Review of the semester
15 Review of the semester
16 -

 

Course Textbooks Dilon, Michele. 2014. Introduction to Sociological Theory: Theorists, Concepts and Their Applicability to the Twenty-First Century. Oxford: Wiley & Blackwell. Elliott, Anthony. 2014. Contemporary Social Theory: An Introduction. NY: Routledge. Johnson, Doyle Paul. 2008. Contemporary Sociological Theory: An Integrated Multi-level Approach. New York: Springer. Wallace, Ruth & Wolf, Allison. Contemporary Sociological Theory: Continuing the Classical Tradition. NJ: Prentice Hall.
References Case studies will be presented for some lectures to critically evaluate the theoretical models being discussed

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
14
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
3
30
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
1
30
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
70
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
4
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
3
7
Presentation / Jury
Project
25
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
10
Final / Oral Exam
1
10
    Total
145

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to scientifically examine concepts and ideas in the field of sociology; to be able to interpret and evaluate data. X
2 To be able to define classical and contemporary theories in sociology; to be able to identify the differences and similarities among those theories and to be able to evaluate them. X
3 To be able to critically use the knowledge acquired in the field of sociology X
4 To be able to plan and conduct, individually or as a member of a team, an entire sociological research process with the knowledge of methodological requirements of the field. X
5 To be able to identify and evaluate local, regional and global issues and problems. X
6 To be able to share their ideas and solutions supplemented by qualitative and quantitative data in written and oral forms. X
7 To be able to make use of other disciplines related to sociology and to have core knowledge related to those disciplines. X
8 To be able to follow developments in sociology and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1) X
9 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To have social and scholarly values and ethical principles during the collection and interpretation of data for implementation, publication, dissemination, and maintenance X
12 To acquire life long learning abilities that will enable the socially responsible application of knowledge based on their field of study to their professional and everyday lives. X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest