SOC 208 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Political Sociology
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
SOC 208
Fall
3
0
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The course is designed to show the broad social bases of politics and to identify the nature, forms and consequences of interactions taking place between individual, society and the state. To do this, it provides insight into major political sociological theories and helps students make sense of the many major social and political changes taking place in the world.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • will be able to discuss from a sociological perspective, the emergence and development of modern state.
  • will be able to define major characteristics of democratic, totalitarian and authoritarian regimes.
  • will be able to make analytical evaluations on how social factors (ethnicity, identity, gender) and institutions (economy, civil society) shape and be shaped by politics.
  • will be able to define how political parties bridge the gap between society and political institutions.
  • will be able to identify social factors which motivate or demotivate citizens in political participation.
  • will be able to develop prospective explanations on the effects of globalization and global social movements on political institutions and processes.
Course Content The course moves from the assumption that there is a reciprocal relationship between society and politics in the sense that as social actors and processes shape political processes and institutions, the latter also retains greater capacity to shape the social. The course hence focuses on the complex interactions that take place between economy and politics, states and societies, civil society and politics, and it extends the discussion to basic forms of political rule, power and equality, political parties and factors behind political participation.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Opening session: Introduction to political sociology; Course Introduction
2 Foundations of Political Sociology Kate Nash (2010). Contemporary Political Sociology, Oxford: Wiley-Blacwell, pp: 1-20. Edwin Amenta, Kate Nash, Alan Scott, eds. (2012). The Wiley-Blackwell companion to Political Sociology, Oxford: Wiley-Blacwell, pp: 3-35.
3 Power, Politics and the Political Bob Jessop (2004) ‘Developments in Marxist Theory’ in Kate Nash and Alan Scott, eds., The Blackwell Companion to Political Sociology, pp. 7- 16. Richard Bellamy (2004) ‘Developments in Pluralist and Elite Approaches’ in Kate Nash and Alan Scott, eds., The Blackwell Companion to Political Sociology, pp. 17- 28. Keith Dowding (2004) ‘Rational Choice Approaches to Analyzing Power’ in Kate Nash and Alan Scott, eds., The Blackwell Companion to Political Sociology, pp. 28-39.
4 Power, Politics and the Political Barry Hindess (2012) ‘Foucaultian Analysis of Power, Government, Politics’ in Edwin Amenta, Kate Nash, Alan Scott, eds. (2012) The Wiley-Blackwell companion to Political Sociology, pp: 36-46. Kate Nash (2010). Contemporary Political Sociology, pp: 20- 29. Jacob Torfing (2005) The Linguistic Turn: Foucault, Laclau, Mouffe, and Zizek’ In Janoski et al. (eds.), The Handbook of Political Sociology: States, Civil Societies and Globalization, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp: 153- 171. 

5 THE STATE: Formation of the Modern States Gianfranco Poggi (2006). “Theories of state formation.” In K. Nash and A. Scott (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Political Sociology, pp: 95-106. Thomas Ertman (2005) State Formation and State Building in Europe In Janoski et al. (eds.), The Handbook of Political Sociology: States, Civil Societies and Globalization, pp: 367- 383
6 THE STATE: Transformation of Modern States Jeffrey Goodwin (2005) ‘Revolutions and Revolutionary Movements’ In Janoski et al. (eds.), The Handbook of Political Sociology: States, Civil Societies and Globalization, pp: 404- 422. Charles Tilly (2005) ‘Regimes and Contention’ In Janoski et al. (eds.), The Handbook of Political Sociology: States, Civil Societies and Globalization, pp: 423- 440.
7 THE STATE: The Logic of Modern States James C. Scott (1998). Seeing Like a State. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, pp: 1-52.
8 Mid-term Exam
9 Democracy Kate Nash (2010). Contemporary Political Sociology, pp: 193- 236. Dietrich Rueschemeyer (2012)‘Democratization’ in Edwin Amenta, Kate Nash, Alan Scott, eds. (2012) The Wiley-Blackwell companion to Political Sociology, pp: 454- 465. Colin Crouch (2012) Democracy and Capitalism in the Wake of
the Financial Crisis in Edwin Amenta, Kate Nash, Alan Scott, eds. (2012) The Wiley-Blackwell companion to Political Sociology, pp: 454- 465.
10 Citizenship Kate Nash (2010). Contemporary Political Sociology, pp: 131- 147; 176- 192.
11 Social Movements Kate Nash (2010). Contemporary Political Sociology, pp: 87- 130. J. Craig Jenkins and William Form (2005) ‘Social Movements and Social Change’ in Janoski et al. (eds.), The Handbook of Political Sociology: States, Civil Societies and Globalization, pp: 331- 349.
12 Social Movements in Authoritarian Contexts James Scott (1990) Domination and the Arts of Resistance, New Haven and London: Yale University Press 1-16; 136- 182.
13 Review of the semester
14 Review of the semester
15 Final Exam
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Textbooks

Kate Nash (2010) Contemporary Poltical Sociology, NY: Blackwell.

Edwin Amenta, Kate Nash, Alan Scott, eds. (2012). The Wiley-Blackwell companion to Political Sociology, Oxford: Wiley-Blacwell.

 
 
 
References

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
16
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
3
30
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
1
30
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
100
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
3
Homework / Assignments
2
Presentation / Jury
12
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
20
Final / Oral Exam
1
    Total
110

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to scientifically examine concepts and ideas in the field of sociology; to be able to interpret and evaluate data. X
2 To be able to define classical and contemporary theories in sociology; to be able to identify the differences and similarities among those theories and to be able to evaluate them. X
3 To be able to critically use the knowledge acquired in the field of sociology X
4 To be able to plan and conduct, individually or as a member of a team, an entire sociological research process with the knowledge of methodological requirements of the field. X
5 To be able to identify and evaluate local, regional and global issues and problems. X
6 To be able to share their ideas and solutions supplemented by qualitative and quantitative data in written and oral forms. X
7 To be able to make use of other disciplines related to sociology and to have core knowledge related to those disciplines. X
8 To be able to follow developments in sociology and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1) X
9 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To have social and scholarly values and ethical principles during the collection and interpretation of data for implementation, publication, dissemination, and maintenance X
12 To acquire life long learning abilities that will enable the socially responsible application of knowledge based on their field of study to their professional and everyday lives. X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest