SOC 320 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Aging Society
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
SOC 320
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives To introduce students with basic sociological terms and discussions of the aging society.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • will be able to discuss the general terminology and perspectives of the aging society.
  • will be able to question particular social, psychological, biological and economic problems within the framework of the aging society.
  • will be able to discuss various aspects of the experience of aging at the global and national levels.
  • will be able to analyze policy debates on the status of aging population.
  • will be able to examine the objective and subjective factors shaping social position of the aging population.
  • will be able to evaluate social and institutional care options for aging population.
  • will be able to discuss the ways to improve the quality of life for elder people.
Course Content This course discusses peculiar dynamics and problems of aging by examining sociological theories on the aging society. It aims to understand economic, social and cultural life experiences of older population in a crosscultural perspective. It also examines living arrangements and social policies required to empower older people.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Presentation and OVerview of the Course
2 Introduction to the Field of Social Gerontology L.J. Malcolm (ed.), The Cambridge Handbook Of Age And Aging, 2005, Cambridge University Press, Chapter 1.1 and 1.2
3 Causes and Consequences of Ageism E. B. Palmore, Ageism: Negative And Positive, 1999, Springer Publisher Company, Part 2
4 Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Aging J. Quadagno, Aging and the Life Course: An Introduction to Social Gerantology, 1999, The McGrawHill Companies, Chapters, 5,6,7 Suggested reading: A.G. Baran “Yaşlılığın Anlamı Üzerine Niteliksel Araştırma”, II.Ulusal Yaşlılık Kongresi Kitabı, 2003, 9 12 Nisan, Denizli: 121 140.
5 Welfare State and Politics of Age J. Quadagno, Aging and the Life Course: An Introduction to Social Gerantology, 1999, The McGrawHill Companies, Chapter 4 G. E. Andersen, et al. (ed), Why Do We Need a New Welfare State, in J. Myles, “A New Social Contract for the Elderly”, 2002, Oxford University publications, pp. 130 173.
6 MIDTERM I
7 Social Aspects of Aging J. Quadagno, Aging and the Life Course: An Introduction to Social Gerantology, 1999, The McGrawHill Companies, Chapters 8,9 N. Agahi and M.P. Parker, “Leisure activities and mortality: Does gender matter?”,Journal of Aging and Health, 2008, 20(7): 855 871.
8 Living Arrangement for Elders J. Quadagno, Aging and the Life Course: An Introduction to Social Gerantology, 1999, The McGrawHill Companies, Chapters 10, 13 A. Bukov, I. Maas, and T. Lampert, “Social participation in very old age: Cross sectional and longitudinal findings from BASE”, Journal of Gerontology, 2002, 57(6): 510 517.
9 Successful Aging and Increasing the Quality of Life P. Baltes & M. Baltes, Succesful Aging: Perspectives From The Behavioral Sciences, Cambridge University Press 1993, pp.4, 5, 1927. C. Borg et al., “Life satisfaction in 6 European countries: The relationship to health, selfesteem, and social and financial resources among people (aged 6589) with reduced functional capacity”, Geriatric Nursing, 2008, 29(1), 48 57.
10 Elder abuse, Gender and Aging S. Crichton et al., “Elder Abuse Feminist and Ageist Perspectives”, Journal Of Elder Abuse & Neglect, 1999, 10(34), 115 130 J.C. Henrard, J. C. “CulturalProblems of Aging Especially Regarding Gender and Intergenerational Equity”, Social Science & Medicine, 1996, 43 (5), 667 680.
11 Area studies: The Status of the Old Age Population in Turkey T. Ünalan, “The Status of the Old Age Population in Turkey” in Nüfusbilim Dergisi, 2000, 22 (1) pp. 25 35, Hacettepe Üniversitesi Nüfus Etütleri Enstitüsü Suggested reading: A.G. Baran, “Türkiye’de Yaşlılık Politikalarının Sosyolojik Analizi”, I. Ulusal Yaşlılık Kongresi Kitabı, 2001, 10 11 Ekim, Ankara: 256 277.
12 MIDTERM II
13 Area studies: Intergenerational Solidarity and migration in Turkey Kalaycıoğlu, S. ve H. RittersbergerTılıç (2000). “Intergenerational Solidarity Networks of Instrumental and Cultural Transfers within the Migrant Families in Turkey.” Aging And Society. Cilt:20. ss. 523 542. Suggested readings: S. Kalaycıoglu, and H. Rittersberger Tılıç, H. (2001). “Yaşlı ve genç kuşaklar arasında sosyal, kültürel, ekonomik bağların ailenin refah düzeyine etkisi”, Yaşlı Sorunları Araştırma Dergisi, 1(2):65 75. Ö. Arun, “Yaşlı bireyin Türkiye serüveni, kaliteli yaşlanma imkanı üzerine Senaryolar”, Gaziantep Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi, 2008, 7(2): 313 330.
14 Coping Strategies with Aging L. Demers et al., “Coping strategies and social participation in older adults”, Journal of Gerontology, 2009, 55:233 239 A. Jonker et al., “The role of coping resources on change in wellbeing during persistent health decline”, Journal of Aging and Health, 2009, 21:10 63 World NGO Forum, Final Declaration and Recommendation of the World NGO Forum on Aging: “Development and the Rights of the Elderly”, 2002, Madrid.
15 Review of the Semester
16 Final Exam

 

Course Textbooks Must readings mentioned in this information sheet.
References

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
15
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
15
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
2
40
Final / Oral Exam
1
35
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
65
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
35
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
12
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
2
14
Final / Oral Exam
1
9
    Total
145

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to scientifically examine concepts and ideas in the field of sociology; to be able to interpret and evaluate data. X
2 To be able to define classical and contemporary theories in sociology; to be able to identify the differences and similarities among those theories and to be able to evaluate them. X
3 To be able to critically use the knowledge acquired in the field of sociology X
4 To be able to plan and conduct, individually or as a member of a team, an entire sociological research process with the knowledge of methodological requirements of the field.
5 To be able to identify and evaluate local, regional and global issues and problems. X
6 To be able to share their ideas and solutions supplemented by qualitative and quantitative data in written and oral forms. X
7 To be able to make use of other disciplines related to sociology and to have core knowledge related to those disciplines. X
8 To be able to follow developments in sociology and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1) X
9 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To have social and scholarly values and ethical principles during the collection and interpretation of data for implementation, publication, dissemination, and maintenance X
12 To acquire life long learning abilities that will enable the socially responsible application of knowledge based on their field of study to their professional and everyday lives. X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest