SOC 430 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Gender and Social Change
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
SOC 430
Spring
3
0
3
7

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives To discuss the basic concepts and theories of gender studies and to expand an awareness of gendered society.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • will be able to explain the terms sex, gender, gendered society and different theoretical approached in gender studies.
  • will be able to discuss the social construction of masculinity and femininity.
  • will be able to discuss the basic concepts of feminist theory.
  • will be able to question the gender inequalities in regard to different social institutions and domains like family, work life, intimacies, media, politics, and space.
  • will be able to question the gender of violence.
Course Content The course introduce to basic discussions of gender studies. Topics include sex, gender, masculinity, femininity, queer theory, feminism, gendered society. The concept of gendered society is discussed with reference to the different contexts like family, work life, media, body, and education

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Presentation and overview of the course
2 Thinking About Gender Judith Lorber, “The Social Construction of Gender”, in RG (112 119)Martha McCaughey, Caveman “Masculinity: Finding Manhood in Evolutionary Science” in GSR
3 Critiques of the Sex Roles Model Judith Lorber, “Men as Women and Women as Men: Disrupting Gender” , in GSR Cofer, Judith Ortiz, “The Myth of the Latin Woman: I Just Met a Girl Named Maria” in RG Jack Sawyer, “On Male Liberation”, in FM
4 The Social Construction of Masculinity Emmanuel Reynaud, “Holy Virility: The Social Construction of Masculinity” in FM; Michael S Kimmel, “Masculinity as Homophobia” in RG; Messner, “Boyhood, Organized Sports, and the Construction of Masculinities” in RG
5 Psychology of Sex Roles Janet Sibley Hyde ,”The Gender Similarities Hypothesis” in GSR Peggy C. Giordano, Monica A. Longmore, and Wendy D. Manning, “Gender and the Meanings of Adolescent Romantic Relationships: A Focus on Boys” in GSR
6 Midterm
7 Gendered Family Rubin, Lillian B., “The Transformation of Family Life” in RG Collins, Patricia Hill, “Bloodmothers, othermothers, and women centered network”s in RG Gerson, Kathleen, “No Man’s Land: Men’s Changing Commitments to Family and Work” in RG
8 Gendered Work Life Albelda, Randy and Tilly, Chris, It’s A Family Affair:” Women, Poverty, and Welfare” in RG Kristen Schilt and Matthew Wiswall, “Before and After: Gender Transitions, Human Capital, and Workplace Experiences” in GSR
9 Gendered Media Jane D. Brown and Carol J. Pardun, “Little in Common: Racial and Gender Differences in Adolescents’ Television Diets”” in GSR Ronald Weitzer and Charis E. Kubrin, “Misogyny in Rap Music: A Content Analysis of Prevalence and Meanings” in GSR
10 Gendered Body Saltzberg, Elaine A. And Chrisler, Joan C.,” Beauty is the Beast: Psychological Effects of the Pursuit of the Perfect Female Body” in RG Susan Bordo, “The Body and the Reproduction of Femininity” in GSR
11 Gendered Intimacies Stoltenberg, Jon, “How Men Have (a) Sex” in RG Sabo, Don,” The Myth of the Sexual Athlete” in RG Robert Jensen, “Using Pornography” in RG Beth A. Quinn, “Sexual Harassment and Masculinity: The Power and Meaning of “Girl Watching”” in GSR
12 Gendered Classroom Diane Reay, “ “Spice Girls,” “Nice Girls,” “Girlies,” and “Tomboys”: Gender Discourses, Girls’ Cultures, and Femininities in the Primary Classroom” in GSR; Wayne Martino, “”Cool Boys,” “Party Animals,” “Squid,” and “Poofters”: Interrogating the Dynamics and Politics of Adolescent Masculinities in School” in GSR
13 Gender of Violence Kaye/Kantrowitz, Melanie, “Women, Violence and Resistance” in RG Carol Cohn, Wars, Wimps and Women: “Talking Gender and Thinking War” in GSR Russell P. Dobash, R. Emerson Dobash, Margo Wilson, and Martin Daly, “The Myth of Sexual Symmetry in Marital Violence” inGSR
14 Presentations
15 Review of the semester
16 Final exam

 

Course Textbooks Disch, Estelle. (ed.) 2003. Reconstructing Gender: A Multicultural Anthology, RG, Boston: McGrawHill Humanities Michael Kimmel and Amy Aronson, (ed.) 2010, The Gendered Society Reader, GSR, Fourth Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press
References

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
16
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
10
Presentation / Jury
1
15
Project
1
35
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
-
-
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
65
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
35
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
5
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
15
Presentation / Jury
1
15
Project
1
25
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
20
Final / Oral Exam
-
    Total
203

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to scientifically examine concepts and ideas in the field of sociology; to be able to interpret and evaluate data. X
2 To be able to define classical and contemporary theories in sociology; to be able to identify the differences and similarities among those theories and to be able to evaluate them. X
3 To be able to critically use the knowledge acquired in the field of sociology X
4 To be able to plan and conduct, individually or as a member of a team, an entire sociological research process with the knowledge of methodological requirements of the field.
5 To be able to identify and evaluate local, regional and global issues and problems. X
6 To be able to share their ideas and solutions supplemented by qualitative and quantitative data in written and oral forms.
7 To be able to make use of other disciplines related to sociology and to have core knowledge related to those disciplines. X
8 To be able to follow developments in sociology and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1) X
9 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To have social and scholarly values and ethical principles during the collection and interpretation of data for implementation, publication, dissemination, and maintenance X
12 To acquire life long learning abilities that will enable the socially responsible application of knowledge based on their field of study to their professional and everyday lives. X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest