SOC 440 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Sociology of Art
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
SOC 440
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives To provide an investigation of the basic problems in the sociology of the arts through an application of its fundamental concepts to the various dimensions of aesthetic experience and a discussion of its central controversies.

Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • will be able to understand and use the basic concepts constituting the sociology of the arts.
  • will be able to evaluate the central approaches contructed in the sociological examination of aesthetic experience.
  • will be able to contrast the salient differences between the production and the consumption of art; and establish connections between these two fields.
  • will be able to reflect critically on the criteria of judgments of taste by analyzing the relation between works of art and their social context: are there universal standards of taste?
  • will be able to assess the roles and the status of the artist—and the numerous networks that enmesh him/her—in modern societies.
  • will be able to evaluate works of art in terms of their political function: what makes art emancipatory or repressive, progressive or conservative?
  • will be able to discuss critically the distinction between high and low, classical and pop art.
Course Content The course involves an examination of the fundamental problems that define the basic orientations in the sociological study of aesthetic experience: 1) what is art? 2) What is a social context and how does it bear on the dimensions of aesthetic experience?
3) What are the relevant criteria of evaluation in the spheres of production and consumption (of works of art)? Reflection, shaping, and reception approaches. 4) Who is an artist in relation to his/her society? 5) What political functions does art serve in modern societies?
The course involves an examination of the fundamental problems that define the basic orientations in the sociological study of aesthetic experience: 1) what is art? 2) What is a social context and how does it bear on the dimensions of aesthetic experience?
3) What are the relevant criteria of evaluation in the spheres of production and consumption (of works of art)? Reflection, shaping, and reception approaches. 4) Who is an artist in relation to his/her society? 5) What political functions does art serve in modern societies?

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Presentation and overview of the course; viewing of and discussion on Un Chien Andalou (Luis Buñuel, 1929)
2 What is art? What is aesthetic experience? Zolberg, pp. 1 29
3 How does one go from “This is beautiful” to a sociology of the arts (and back again)? Zolberg, pp. 53 79; Eagleton, pp. 1 16
4 The work of art as social process. Reflection approaches and shaping approaches. Zolberg, pp. 79 107; Alexander, pp. 21 37 & 41 55
5 Reception approaches and audience studies. Zolberg, pp. 136 162; Alexander, pp. 181 222
6 Art and social boundaries. Alexander, pp. 225 244
7 MIDTERM
8 Aesthetic experience and its vicissitudes (1): how to evaluate the evaluations of art. Bourdieu, RA, pp. 214 274
9 Aesthetic experience and its vicissitudes (2): the social uses of art. Bourdieu, DJT, pp. 257 318
10 “A strange sensation: controversies in art.” Alexander, pp. 278 305
11 The function of the artist. Zolberg, pp. 107 136; Alexander, pp. 131 152
12 Ways of seeing (1): the social space of perception. Alexander, pp. 251 278; Sontag, OP, pp. 3 85
13 Wk 12 cont’d. Sontag, pp. 85 183; Berger, WS, pp. 1 34
14 Ways of seeing (2): the political space of perception. Ranciere, DPA, pp. 115 205
15 Research Paper Submission and Review of the course. Research paper submission deadline.
16 Final Final

 

Course Textbooks Zolberg, Vera L., Constructing a Sociology of the Arts, Cambridge University Press (1990); Alexander, Victoria D., Sociology of the Arts: Exploring Fine and Popular Forms, WileyBlackwell (2003); Eagleton, Terry, Literary Theory: An Introduction, University of Minnesota Press (2008); Sontag, Susan, On Photography, Picador (2001) Bourdieu, Pierre, Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste, Harvard University Press (1987), The Rules of Art: Genesis and Structure of the Literary Field, Stanford University Press (1996) John Berger, Ways of Seeing, Penguin (1990)
References Lectures will incorporate audio and visual material which will serve as starting points for class discussions

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
4
20
Presentation / Jury
1
20
Project
1
25
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
25
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
75
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
25
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
4
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
4
1
Presentation / Jury
1
Project
1
9
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
10
Final / Oral Exam
10
    Total
135

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to scientifically examine concepts and ideas in the field of sociology; to be able to interpret and evaluate data. X
2 To be able to define classical and contemporary theories in sociology; to be able to identify the differences and similarities among those theories and to be able to evaluate them. X
3 To be able to critically use the knowledge acquired in the field of sociology X
4 To be able to plan and conduct, individually or as a member of a team, an entire sociological research process with the knowledge of methodological requirements of the field. X
5 To be able to identify and evaluate local, regional and global issues and problems.
6 To be able to share their ideas and solutions supplemented by qualitative and quantitative data in written and oral forms. X
7 To be able to make use of other disciplines related to sociology and to have core knowledge related to those disciplines. X
8 To be able to follow developments in sociology and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1) X
9 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To have social and scholarly values and ethical principles during the collection and interpretation of data for implementation, publication, dissemination, and maintenance X
12 To acquire life long learning abilities that will enable the socially responsible application of knowledge based on their field of study to their professional and everyday lives. X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest