SOC 480 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Modernity, Space and Culture
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
SOC 480
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives To explore the complex relationships of space and culture in “modern times”.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • will be able to discuss the different dimensions of modern city and modern culture.
  • will be able to explain the cultural aspects of mass society.
  • will be able to evaluate the relationship between individual and society in city life.
  • will be able to discuss the importance of public spaces in urban life and political culture.
  • will be able to question the different forms of power relations in urban life.
Course Content The course explores cultural aspects of spatial practices with referance to history of modernity. Selected topics of the course are modern city, culture, symbolic economies, culture industry, public space, gaze, spectatorship, panopticon, everyday lives, contesting identity, boundaries, transgression and utopias.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Presentation and overview of the course
2 Modern City Iain Borden, Tim Hall, Malcolm Miles (ed.), The City Cultures Reader, Part I
3 Modern Culture Iain Borden, Tim Hall, Malcolm Miles (ed.), The City Cultures Reader, Part 2
4 Symbolic Economies Iain Borden, Tim Hall, Malcolm Miles (ed.), The City Cultures Reader, Part 3
5 Culture Industries Iain Borden, Tim Hall, Malcolm Miles (ed.), The City Cultures Reader, Part 4
6 Public Spaces Gary Bridge, Sophie Watson (ed.), The Blackwell City Reader, p: 261 302
7 Gaze, Spectatorship and Panopticon Gary Bridge, Sophie Watson (ed.), The Blackwell City Reader, p: 221 227
8 Midterm
9 Everyday Lives Iain Borden, Tim Hall, Malcolm Miles (ed.), The City Cultures Reader, Part 6
10 Contesting Identity Iain Borden, Tim Hall, Malcolm Miles (ed.), The City Cultures Reader, Part 7
11 Boundaries and Transgression Iain Borden, Tim Hall, Malcolm Miles (ed.), The City Cultures Reader, Part 8
12 Utopies and Dystopias Iain Borden, Tim Hall, Malcolm Miles (ed.), The City Cultures Reader, Part9
13 Presentations
14 Presentations
15 Rewiev of the Semester
16 Final

 

Course Textbooks Iain Borden, Tim Hall, Malcolm Miles (ed.) 2004,The City Cultures Reader, New york: Routledge; Gary Bridge, Sophie Watson (ed.) 2010, The Blackwell City Reader, Oxford: WileyBlackwell
References

Additional readings may be assigned during the semester.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
15
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
10
Homework / Assignments
1
30
Presentation / Jury
2
30
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
20
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
100
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
Homework / Assignments
1
14
Presentation / Jury
2
20
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
20
Final / Oral Exam
20
    Total
170

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to scientifically examine concepts and ideas in the field of sociology; to be able to interpret and evaluate data. X
2 To be able to define classical and contemporary theories in sociology; to be able to identify the differences and similarities among those theories and to be able to evaluate them. X
3 To be able to critically use the knowledge acquired in the field of sociology X
4 To be able to plan and conduct, individually or as a member of a team, an entire sociological research process with the knowledge of methodological requirements of the field.
5 To be able to identify and evaluate local, regional and global issues and problems. X
6 To be able to share their ideas and solutions supplemented by qualitative and quantitative data in written and oral forms. X
7 To be able to make use of other disciplines related to sociology and to have core knowledge related to those disciplines. X
8 To be able to follow developments in sociology and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1) X
9 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To have social and scholarly values and ethical principles during the collection and interpretation of data for implementation, publication, dissemination, and maintenance X
12 To acquire life long learning abilities that will enable the socially responsible application of knowledge based on their field of study to their professional and everyday lives. X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest