HUM 102 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
History of Civilization II
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
HUM 102
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The basic purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the basic evolutionary developments in the History of Western Civiliziaitons and to enable them to analyze these developments, through a comparative perspective, in the economic, sociopolitical, cultural and scientific field for understanding the dynamics of the modern world.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • will be able to explain the basic terms, conceptions and definitions peculiar to the discipline of history
  • will be able to define and explain the socio-economic, cultural, religious and political formations and structures in the history of Europe by the way of exemplification.
  • will be able to analyze the important historical facts and devolopments in the framework of causality and in a comparative perspective.
  • will be able to synthesize the historical data they obtain directly and objectively from the sources
  • will be able to criticise the dynamics of the modern world by taking the historical instances into consideration.
  • will be able to express their knowledge and thoughts orally and by writing.
Course Content The content of the course Hum 101 starts with the Prehistoric Ages and deals with the first civilizations, Ancient greek and Roman cultural and political developments, the Byzantine Empire and the basic important developments in Europe during the Medieval Age.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
X
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction: The Rise of Western Civilizaiton Renaissance & Reform Robert E. Lerner, et al., Western Civilizaitons, Their History and Their Culture, London, 1998.
2 The years of inventions in Europe The economic and social reflections of the inventions in Europe Robert E. Lerner, et al., Western Civilizaitons, Their History and Their Culture, London, 1998.
3 Martin Luther: The spread of Protestanism John Calvin: Calvinism Robert E. Lerner, et al., Western Civilizaitons, Their History and Their Culture, London, 1998.
4 Catholic Reform: Its causes and consequences Robert E. Lerner, et al., Western Civilizaitons, Their History and Their Culture, London, 1998.
5 Europe at the Early Modern Age: Economy and society Capitalism, mercantilism and commercial developments Robert E. Lerner, et al., Western Civilizaitons, Their History and Their Culture, London, 1998.
6 1st midterm exam Robert E. Lerner, et al., Western Civilizaitons, Their History and Their Culture, London, 1998.
7 Colonization and Oversea trade Agriculture and Industry Robert E. Lerner, et al., Western Civilizaitons, Their History and Their Culture, London, 1998.
8 From Empire to national state in Europe France and England Robert E. Lerner, et al., Western Civilizaitons, Their History and Their Culture, London, 1998.
9 Revolutions in Western Civilization Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment Art and Literature Robert E. Lerner, et al., Western Civilizaitons, Their History and Their Culture, London, 1998.
10 French Revolution The rise of the principle of nationalism and its development Robert E. Lerner, et al., Western Civilizaitons, Their History and Their Culture, London, 1998.
11 Industrial Revolution Urbanization and the Class consciousness, Imperialism and its consequences Robert E. Lerner, et al., Western Civilizaitons, Their History and Their Culture, London, 1998.
12 2nd midterm exam Robert E. Lerner, et al., Western Civilizaitons, Their History and Their Culture, London, 1998.
13 Europe as the modern civilization Social and economic life Plitical life Robert E. Lerner, et al., Western Civilizaitons, Their History and Their Culture, London, 1998.
14 General evaluation
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Textbooks the related chapters of the books mentioned
References M. Kishlansky, P. Geary, P. O’Brien. Civilization in the West, 6th ed. New York: Pearson Inc., 2006. Server Tanilli, Uygarlık Tarihi, İstanbul, 2006.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
2
50
Final / Oral Exam
1
50
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
50
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
50
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
4
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
2
20
Final / Oral Exam
1
27
    Total
171

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to scientifically examine concepts and ideas in the field of sociology; to be able to interpret and evaluate data. X
2 To be able to define classical and contemporary theories in sociology; to be able to identify the differences and similarities among those theories and to be able to evaluate them. X
3 To be able to critically use the knowledge acquired in the field of sociology X
4 To be able to plan and conduct, individually or as a member of a team, an entire sociological research process with the knowledge of methodological requirements of the field. X
5 To be able to identify and evaluate local, regional and global issues and problems. X
6 To be able to share their ideas and solutions supplemented by qualitative and quantitative data in written and oral forms. X
7 To be able to make use of other disciplines related to sociology and to have core knowledge related to those disciplines. X
8 To be able to follow developments in sociology and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1) X
9 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To have social and scholarly values and ethical principles during the collection and interpretation of data for implementation, publication, dissemination, and maintenance X
12 To acquire life long learning abilities that will enable the socially responsible application of knowledge based on their field of study to their professional and everyday lives. X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest