SOC 380 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Environmental Sociology
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
SOC 380
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course introduces students to key concepts and provides a brief overview of environmental sociology as a field.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • • Explain the relationship between societies and their environments from a sociological perspective.
  • • Describe the way that social differences structure the way people understand the environment.
  • • Explain how classical sociological theory relates to contemporary environmental sociology
  • • Analyze social, political, economic and cultural dimensions of environmental problems
  • • Discuss the limits and potential of changes in technology, politics, and individual lifestyles for sustainability
Course Content Environmental sociology encourage students to use their sociological imagination to explore a wide variety of environmental challenges, controversies and issues at every level from the global to local. Students will develop a critical understanding of social relationships, institutions, practices and processes that shape the interaction between societies and their environments. More specifically, students will learn the social causes and consequences of policy decisions, technological choices, daily lifestyle practices, social movements affecting environmental degradation. This course provide students the frameworks they need to approach environmental problems from a sociological perspective.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction of Environmental sociology and Overview of the course. Documentary screening: The Food Inc.
2 Environmental Issues and Debates Leslie King and Deborah McCarthy (2009). “Introduction”. In Environmental Sociology: From Analysis to Action. (Ed: King and McCarthy). 1-24. John Bellamy Foster (1999) ‘The Ecological Crisis’. The Vulnerable Planet, Monthly Review Press, chapter 1. Video: The Children of Tsunami (topdocumentaryfilms.com)
3 Political Economy and Ecology: Industrialization or Capitalism? Susan G. Davis (2009).“Touch the Magic”. Chp. 8 in Environmental Sociology: From Analysis to Action. (Ed: King and McCarthy). 128-148.
4 The Modern Economy John Bellamy Foster (1999), "Expansion and Conservation". The Vulnerable Planet, Monthly Review Press, chapter 4. John Bellamy Foster (1999) "Imperialism and Ecology". The Vulnerable Planet, Monthly Review Press, chapter 5. Video: Chernobyl: The Exclusion Zone (topdocumentaryfilms.com)
5 Consumer Society Allan Schnaiberg and Kenneth Alan Gould (2009) ‘Treadmill Predispositions and Social Responses: Population, Consumption, and Technological Change’ in Environmental Sociology: From Analysis to Action. (Ed: King and McCarthy), 51- 62. Video: History: Consumerism (youtube)
6 The social construction of nature Susan G. Davis (2009).“Touch the Magic”. Chp. 8 in Environmental Sociology: From Analysis to Action. (Ed: King and McCarthy). 128-148. John Bellamy Foster (1999) " The Socialization of Nature". The Vulnerable Planet, Monthly Review Press, chapter 7.
7 Midterm Exam
8 Environmental Injustice: Race, Class and Gender David Schlosberg (2007) Defining Environmental Justice: Theories, Movements, and Nature, Oford University Press, 3-10. Robert D. Bullard and Glenn S. Johnson. (2009). “Environmental Justice: Grassroots Activism and Its Impact on Public Policy Decision Making”. in Environmental Sociology: From Analysis to Action. (Ed: King and McCarthy). 63-79. Video: Canada’s Toxic Chemical Valley (topdocumentaryfilms.com)
9 Globalization and Ecology R. Scott Frey, Paul K. Gellert, and Harry F. Dahms (2019) ‘Introduction: Ecologically Unequal Exchange in Comparative and Historical Perspective’ in Ecologically Unequal Exchange: Environmental Injustice in Comparative and Historical Perspective (Ed: R. Scott Frey, Paul K. Gellert, and Harry F. Dahms), 1- 10. Daniel Faber. (2009). “The Unfair Trade-off: Globalization and the Export of Ecological Hazards”. Chp. 11. in Environmental Sociology: From Analysis to Action. (Ed: King and McCarthy). 181-199 Video: Chevron vs. Amazon (topdocumentaryfilms.com).
10 Media and Popular Culture Robin Anderson. (2009). “Selling “Mother Earth”: Advertising and the Myth of the Natural”. Chp. 13. in Environmental Sociology: From Analysis to Action. (Ed: King and McCarthy). 215-229.
11 Environmental Movements Timothy Doyle (2005) Introduction to Environmental Movements in Timothy Doyle Envıronmental Movements in Minority And Majority Worlds: A Global Perspective, 1- 20. Christopher Roots (1999) ‘Environmental movements: from the Local to the Global’ in Environmental Movements: Local, National, and the Global (Ed: Christopher Roots) 1- 12.
12 Documentary Screening A Fierce Green Fire: The Battle for a Living Planet
13 Environmental Movements Steven Yearley (2005) ‘How Environmental Problems Come to be ‘Global’:
Sociological Perspectives on the Globalisation of the 
Environment’ 
in “Cultures of Environmentalism Empirical Studies in Environmental Sociology Maria Kousis New challenges for twenty-first-century environmental movements:
agricultural biotechnology and nanotechnology 226
14 Fighting for the Future Michael Maniates (2009) ‘Individualization: Plant a Tree, Buy a Bike, Save the World?’ (Ed: King and McCarthy), 371- 395. Video: Do the Math (topdocumentaryfilms.com).
15 Review of the semester
16 Final Exam

 

Course Textbooks

Leslie King and Deborah McCarthy. (2009). Environmental Sociology: From Analysis to Action. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc: New Work. Second Edition. 

 

References

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
16
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
20
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
1
40
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
60
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
10
Presentation / Jury
10
Project
13
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
20
Final / Oral Exam
1
29
    Total
155

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to scientifically examine concepts and ideas in the field of sociology; to be able to interpret and evaluate data. X
2 To be able to define classical and contemporary theories in sociology; to be able to identify the differences and similarities among those theories and to be able to evaluate them. X
3 To be able to critically use the knowledge acquired in the field of sociology X
4 To be able to plan and conduct, individually or as a member of a team, an entire sociological research process with the knowledge of methodological requirements of the field. X
5 To be able to identify and evaluate local, regional and global issues and problems. X
6 To be able to share their ideas and solutions supplemented by qualitative and quantitative data in written and oral forms. X
7 To be able to make use of other disciplines related to sociology and to have core knowledge related to those disciplines. X
8 To be able to follow developments in sociology and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1) X
9 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level. X
11 To have social and scholarly values and ethical principles during the collection and interpretation of data for implementation, publication, dissemination, and maintenance X
12 To acquire life long learning abilities that will enable the socially responsible application of knowledge based on their field of study to their professional and everyday lives. X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest