SOC 400 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Status, Power and Welfare
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
SOC 400
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The goal of this course is to provide students with the tools necessary for the analysis of status, power and welfare state. It, first, will focus upon one of the basic sociological principles that social groups are stratified according to class, status, and power, providing an overview of the field of social stratification. Then, it will turn to examine the consequences of social inequality by giving special attention to the relation between social inequality and poverty. And finally, the course will examine welfare politics and welfare state, especially with respect to the impact of welfare policies on poverty reduction.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • demonstrate the ability to discuss and analyze the concepts of class, status and power.
  • describe the development, structures, and consequences of social inequalities.
  • identify and describe some of the causes of poverty from a sociological perspective.
  • identify and describe some of the causes of poverty from a sociological perspective.
  • identify and describe some of the causes of poverty from a sociological perspective.
Course Content This course examines the concepts of status, power and welfare from a sociological perspective. By studying the various theoretical approaches to class, status, power, poverty, and welfare, it explores a variety of topics that include class and changing class systems; social status; social power; techniques of power; social and economic inequality; social mobility; the causes and the persistence of poverty; the reduction and alleviation of poverty; welfare state; the effect of welfare policies on social inequality; and the impact of different type of welfare policies on different social groups.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Presentation of the Course
2 Class Marx, K. “Classes in capitalism and Pre-Capitalism”, In D. B. Grusky (Ed.), Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective, pp. 79- 97. Wright, E. O. “A General Framework for the Analysis of Class Structure” In D. B. Grusky (Ed.), Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective, pp. 98- 110 Wallerstein, I. “Class Conflict in the Capitalist World Economy” In D. B. Grusky (Ed.), Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective, pp. 111- 113.
3 Class and Status Grusky, D. B. and Sorensen, J. “Are There Big Social Classes?” In D. B. Grusky (Ed.), Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective, pp. 165- 175. Weber, M. “Class, Status, and Party”, “Status Groups and Classes” In D. B. Grusky (Ed.), Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective, pp. 114- 127. Giddens, A. “The Class Structure of the Advanced Societies” In D. B. Grusky (Ed.), Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective, pp. 132- 142.
4 Class and Status: Distinct Concepts? Tak Wing Chan and John H. Goldthorpe. 2007. “Class and Status: The Conceptual Distinction and its Empirical Relevance” American Sociological Review 72: 512 Bourdieu, P. “Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judegement of Taste” In D. B. Grusky (Ed.), Social Stratification: Class, Race & Gender in Sociological Perspective, pp. 870- 892. Boyne, Roy. 2002. “Bourdieu: From Class to Culture In Memoriam Pierre Bourdieu 1930–2002” Theory, Culture & Society, Vol. 19(3): 117–128
.
5 The Emergence of a New Class? From the Proletariat to Precariat Kalleberg, A.L. 2009. Precarious work, insecure workers: Employment relations in transition. American Sociological Review 74:1-22. Breman, J. and M. van der Linden. 2014. Informalizing the Economy: The Return of the Social Question at a Global Level. Development and Change 45:920-940. Munck, R. 2013. The Precariat: a view from the South. Third World Quarterly 34:747-762.
6 Power Lukes, Steven. “Power: A Radical View” In S. Lukes, Power: A Radical View, pp. 14-59.
7 Power Foucault, M. 1980a. Truth and power. In C. Gordon (Ed.) Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings 1972-1977, pp.109-133. Foucault, M. 1980b. Power and strategies. In C. Gordon (Ed.) Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings 1972-1977, pp. 134-145.
8 Power Foucault, M. 1980c. Two lectures In C. Gordon (Ed.) Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings 1972-1977, pp.78-108. Foucault, M. 1980d. The eye of power. In C. Gordon (Ed.) Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings 1972-1977, pp.146-165.
9 MIDTERM
10 Inequality and Poverty Royce, Edward. 2009. Poverty and Power: The Problem of Structural Inequality. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, pp. 1- 24. Townsend, P and D. Gordon. “Introduction: The human condition is structurally unequal”, In Peter Townsend and David Gordon (Eds.) World Poverty: New policies to defeat an old enemy (Policy Press, 2002) pp. xi- xxiv.
11 OFF
12 Welfare State Paine, Thomas. “The First Welfare State?” In C. Pierson and F. G. Castles (eds)., The Welfare State a Reader (Polity, 2006), pp. 9- 14. Briggs, Asa. “The Welfare State in Historical Perspective”, In C. Pierson and F. G. Castles (eds)., The Welfare State a Reader (Polity, 2006), pp. 16- 29. Offe, Claus. “Some Contradictions of the Modern Welfare State”, In C. Pierson and F. G. Castles (eds)., The Welfare State a Reader (Polity, 2006), pp. 66- 75. Hayek, F. V. “The Meaning of the Welfare State”, In C. Pierson and F. G. Castles (eds)., The Welfare State a Reader (Polity, 2006), pp. 90- 95
13 Poverty and the Welfare State Andersen, Gosta-Esping. “Three Worlds of Welfare Capitalism”, In C. Pierson and F. G. Castles (eds)., The Welfare State: a Reader (Polity, 2006), pp. 160- 174. Schulte, Bernd. “A European definition of poverty: the fight against poverty and social exclusion in the member states of the European Union”, In Peter Townsend and David Gordon (Eds.) World Poverty: New policies to defeat an old enemy (Policy Press, 2002) pp.119- 46.
14 Poverty and the Welfare State Kanji, Nazneen. “Social funds in sub-Saharan Africa: how effective for poverty reduction?”,
 In Peter Townsend and David Gordon (Eds.) World Poverty: New policies to defeat an old enemy (Policy Press, 2002) pp. 233- 250. Townsend, Peter. “Poverty, social exclusion and social polarisation: the need to construct an international welfare state”, In Peter Townsend and David Gordon (Eds.) World Poverty: New policies to defeat an old enemy (Policy Press, 2002) pp.
 3- 24.
15 Future of the Welfare State and Anti-Poverty Policies Andersen, Gosta-Esping. “A Welfare State for the Twenty-First Century”, In C. Pierson and F. G. Castles (eds)., The Welfare State a Reader (Polity, 2006), pp. 434- 454. Lister, Ruth. “Investing in the Citizen-Workers of the Future: Transformation in Citizenship and the State under New Labor”, In C. Pierson and F. G. Castles (eds)., The Welfare State a Reader (Polity, 2006), pp. 455- 472. Townsend, Peter and David Gordon. “Conclusion: constructing an anti-poverty strategy”, In Peter Townsend and David Gordon (Eds.) World Poverty: New policies to defeat an old enemy (Policy Press, 2002) pp. 413- 431.
16 FINAL

 

Course Textbooks Must readings mentioned in this information sheet.
References Documentary and movie screening.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
14
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
25
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
1
35
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
65
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
35
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
25
Presentation / Jury
13
Project
10
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
25
Final / Oral Exam
1
25
    Total
171

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to scientifically examine concepts and ideas in the field of sociology; to be able to interpret and evaluate data. X
2 To be able to define classical and contemporary theories in sociology; to be able to identify the differences and similarities among those theories and to be able to evaluate them. X
3 To be able to critically use the knowledge acquired in the field of sociology X
4 To be able to plan and conduct, individually or as a member of a team, an entire sociological research process with the knowledge of methodological requirements of the field. X
5 To be able to identify and evaluate local, regional and global issues and problems. X
6 To be able to share their ideas and solutions supplemented by qualitative and quantitative data in written and oral forms. X
7 To be able to make use of other disciplines related to sociology and to have core knowledge related to those disciplines. X
8 To be able to follow developments in sociology and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1) X
9 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To have social and scholarly values and ethical principles during the collection and interpretation of data for implementation, publication, dissemination, and maintenance X
12 To acquire life long learning abilities that will enable the socially responsible application of knowledge based on their field of study to their professional and everyday lives. X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest