SOC 402 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Selected Topics in Sociology
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
SOC 402
Spring
3
0
3
8

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
-
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The course aims to familiarise students with the social, cultural, historical, political and economic context in which rural sociology emerges as a distinctive research field. Its objective is to help students gaining understanding of the fundamental concepts, discussions and research methods in rural sociology such as agriculture, food, environment, village, peasantry, community, cultural identity, spatial inequalities and development.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • describe basic theories, concepts and theoretical approaches guided the field of rural sociology
  • describe the historical context in which rural sociology emerged.
  • identify some of the key social problems facing rural communities anf its urban and international counterparts in the 21st century
  • identify sociological research principles in working with members of the rural community, in identifying their needs, and developing social policies for meeting these needs
  • visualize the impact of place in cultural identity and social relations
Course Content The course is organized into three sections. The course begins by exploring theoretical perspectives for studying the sociology of agriculture, food and rural communities. The second section of the course will focus on contemporary issues of global food regimes and agricultural change. The course then explores social movements for civic agriculture and alternative food systems. It addresses broader sociological questions about the socio-spatial identities and socio-spatial inequalities in Turkey and in the world.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Rural Sociology Readings: Howard Newby. (1983). “The Sociology of Agriculture: Toward a New Rural Sociology.” Annual Review of Sociology, 9: 67‐81. Philip McMichael. (2006). "Peasant Prospects in the Neoliberal Age". New Political Economy, 11(3): 407-418. Recommended Readings: Jan Douwe Van der Ploeg. (1993). “Rural Sociology and the New Agrarian Question.” Sociologia Ruralis, 33: 240-60. Frederick H. Buttel. (1980). “Agricultural Structure and Rural Ecology: Toward a Political Economy of Rural Development”. Sociologia Ruralis, 20(1-2): 44-62.
3 The Agrarian Question Readings: Susan A. Mann and James M. Dickinson. (1978). “Obstacles to the Development of Capitalist Agriculture.” The Journal of Peasant Studies, 5: 466-81. Henry Bernstein. (2003). “Farewells to the peasantry”. Transformation, 52: 1-19 Recommended Readings David Goodman and Michael Redclift. (1985) “Capitalism, Petty Commodity Production and the Farm Enterprise.” Sociologia Ruralis 25: 231-47. William H. Friedland. (2002). “Agriculture and Rurality: Beginning the ‘Final Separation’?”. Rural Sociology. 67(3): 350-371.
4 Transformation of Agriculture in Turkey Readings: Caglar Keyder and Zafer Yenal. (2011). “Agrarian Change under Globalization: Markets and Insecurity in Turkish Agriculture.” Journal of Agrarian Change, 11: 60-86. Murat Öztürk, Joost Jongerden and Andy Hilton. (2017). “The (re)production of the new peasantry in Turkey”. Journal of Rural Studies. Xxx. In press. Available online. Recommended Reading Çağlar Keyder. (1983). “The Cycle of Sharecropping and the Consolidation of Small Peasant Ownership in Turkey,” Journal of Peasant Studies, 10: 130–145 Yildiz Atasoy. (2013). “Supermarket Expansion in Turkey: Shifting Relations of Food Provisioning”. Journal of Agrarian Change, 13 (4): 547-570.
5 Rural Development: An Agricultural Paradigm Shift? Readings: Jonathan Murdoch. (2000): "Networks-a New Paradigm of Rural Development?". Journal of Rural Studies 16:407-19. Clive Potter and Jonathan Burney. (2002): "Agricultural Multifunctionality in the WTO—Legitimate Non-Trade Concern or Disguised Protectionism?". Journal of Rural Studies 18: 35-47. Recommended Readings: David Goodman. (2004). "Rural Europe Redux? Reflections on Alternative Agro-Food Networks and Paradigm Change." Sociologia Ruralis. 44: 3-16. Henk Renting, Terry K. Marsden, and Jo Banks. (2003). "Understanding Alternative Food Networks: Exploring the Role of Short Food Supply Chains in Rural Development." Environment and Planning A 35: 393-411.
6 Documentary Screening
7 Women and Rural Livelihoods Readings: Theodosia Anthopoulou. (2010). “Rural Women in Local Agrofood Production: Between Entrepreneurial Initiatives and Family Strategies. A Case Study in Greece.” Journal of Rural Studies, 26: 394-403. Roser Manzanera-Ruiz, Carmen Lizarraga and Rosemarie Mwaipopo. (2016). “Gender Inequality, Processes of Adaptation, and Female Local Initiatives in Cash Crop Production in Northern Tanzania”. Rural Sociology, 81(2):143–171. Recommended Readings: Jo Little, Brian Ilbery, and David Watts. (2009). “Gender, Consumption and the Relocalisation of Food: A Research Agenda.” Sociologia Ruralis, 49 (3): 201-17. Catherine S. Dolan. (2004). “On Farm and Packhouse: Employment at the Bottom of a Global Value Chain”. Rural Sociology, 69 (1): 99–126.
8 Food Security or Food Sovereignty? Social Class and Movements Readings: Annette-Aurelie Desmarais. (2002). “The Via Campesina: Consolidating an International Peasant and Farm Movement”. The Journal of Peasant Studies, 29: 91-124. Marc Edelman. (2005). “Bringing the moral economy back in… to the study of 21st century transnational peasant movements”. American Anthropologist, 107: 331-345. Recommended Readings: John Wilkinson. (2011). “From Fair Trade to Responsible Soy: Social Movements and the Qualification of Agrofood Markets.” Environment and Planning A, 43: 2012-26. Peter L. Taylor, Douglas L. Murray, Laura T. Raynolds. (2005). “Keeping Trade Fair: Governance Challenges in the Fair Trade Coffee Initiative”. Sustainable Development, 13: 199-208.
9 Food, Culture and Place Readings: Elizabeth Barham. (2003). “Translating Terroir: The Global Challenge of French AOC Labeling.” Journal of Rural Studies, 19: 127-38. Derya Nizam. (2017). “Place, food and agriculture: The use of geographical indications in Turkey”. New Perspectives On Turkey, 57: 3-30. Recommended Readings: Sarah Bowen and Kathryn De Master. (2011). “New Rural Livelihoods or Museums of Production? Quality Food Initiatives in Practice”. Journal of Rural Studies, 27: 73-82. Rosemary J. Coombe and Nicole Aylwin. (2011). “Bordering Diversity and Desire: Using Intellectual Property to Mark Place-Based Products”. Environment and Planning A, 43: 2027-42.
10 Food, Knowledge and Power Readings: Julie Guthman. (2007). “The Polanyian Way? Voluntary Food Labels as Neoliberal Governance.” Antipode, 39: 456-78. E. Melanie DuPuis and David Goodman. (2005). “Should We Go 'Home' to Eat? Toward a Reflexive Politics of Localism.” Journal of Rural Studies, 21: 359-71. Recommended Readings: Harriet Friedmann and Amber McNair. (2008). “Whose Rules Rule? Contested Projects to Certify ‘Local Production for Distant Consumers’.” Journal of Agrarian Change, 8:408-34. Maria Fonte. (2008). “Knowledge, Food and Place. A Way of Producing, a Way of Knowing.” Sociologia Ruralis, 48: 200-22.
11 Documentary Screening
12 Student Group Presentations
13 Student Group Presentations
14 Review of the Semester
15 Review of the Semester
16 Final Exam

 

Course Textbooks Readings listed in this form
References The recommending readings will be avaliable on Blackboard.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
16
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
4
20
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
2
20
Project
1
40
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
1
10
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
60
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
4
12
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
2
15
Project
1
40
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
1
15
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
229

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to scientifically examine concepts and ideas in the field of sociology; to be able to interpret and evaluate data. X
2 To be able to define classical and contemporary theories in sociology; to be able to identify the differences and similarities among those theories and to be able to evaluate them. X
3 To be able to critically use the knowledge acquired in the field of sociology X
4 To be able to plan and conduct, individually or as a member of a team, an entire sociological research process with the knowledge of methodological requirements of the field. X
5 To be able to identify and evaluate local, regional and global issues and problems. X
6 To be able to share their ideas and solutions supplemented by qualitative and quantitative data in written and oral forms. X
7 To be able to make use of other disciplines related to sociology and to have core knowledge related to those disciplines. X
8 To be able to follow developments in sociology and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1) X
9 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level. X
11 To have social and scholarly values and ethical principles during the collection and interpretation of data for implementation, publication, dissemination, and maintenance X
12 To acquire life long learning abilities that will enable the socially responsible application of knowledge based on their field of study to their professional and everyday lives. X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest