SOC 450 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Sociology of Body
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
SOC 450
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to familiarize the students with theories of the body and body issues.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • will be able to understand the historical change of the body in the light of religious, philosophical and political debates and explain the reasons and outcomes of this particular transformation.
  • will be able to understand the theoretical discussions of the sociology of body and use its concepts.
  • will be able to analyze criticially place of the body in the discussions concerning sexuality, gender and race.
  • will be able to assess critically the presentation and use of the body in the consumer culture.
  • will be able to explain the conceptualization of the body as labor and critically discuss the place of ‘body as labor’ in the contemporary economic system.
  • will be able to explain the discussions on deformed and disable bodies, and critically assess the politics concerning these bodies.
  • will be able to analyze critically the politics of diciplining and governing the bodies.
Course Content This course presents the major theoretical discussions in the sociology of body by incorporating various classical readings from philosophy and anthropology. It analyses the transformation of the body by particularly adressing the body in the contemporary discussions of gender, sexuality, space, disability, labor and consumer culture. It finally includes the politics concerning the regulation of the bodies.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Presentation and overview of the course.
2 What is Body? Fraser, M. , Greco, M. The Body: A Reader, (Routledge: 2005):S. Coakley (eds), Religion and the Body (Cambridge UP: 2000).
3 Body in Sociology M. Featherstone & M. Hepworth & Bryan S. Turner (eds.), The Body: Social Process and Cultural Theory (Sage: 1991).
4 Body: Negotiating Sex and Gender Margaret Lock, Judith Farquar, Arjun Appadurai, Jean L. Comaroff, Beyond the Body Proper, (Duke Universty Press:2007). J. Price & Margrit Shildrick (eds), Feminist Theory and the Body: A Reader (Routledge: Newyork, 1999).
5 Body and Identity Fraser, M. , Greco, M. , The Body: A Reader, (Routledge: 2005): M. Featherstone & M. Hepworth & Bryan S. Turner (eds.), The Body: Social Process and Cultural Theory (Sage: 1991): Fraser, M. , Greco, M. , The Body: A Reader, (Routledge: 2005).
6 Body in Consumer Culture Fraser, M. , Greco, M. , The Body: A Reader, (Routledge: 2005): M. Featherstone & M. Hepworth & Bryan S. Turner (eds.), The Body: Social Process and Cultural Theory (Sage: 1991).
7 Laboring Body C. Wolkowitz, Bodies At Work (Sage 2006): L. Mcdowell, Working Bodies (WileyBlackwell:2009).
8 Takehome midtermEssays Proposals Due Film Screening Film Screening
9 Body and Space J. Price & Margrit Shildrick (eds), Feminist Theory and the Body: A Reader (Routledge: Newyork, 1999): Margaret Lock, Judith Farquar, Arjun Appadurai, Jean L. Comaroff, Beyond the Body Proper, (Duke Universty Press:2007).
10 Body: Disability and Deformity Mitchell, D.T. & S, L. Snyder (eds)., The Body and Physical Difference, Discourses of Disability (University of Michigan Press: 1997): D. M. Turner & K. Stagg (eds.), Social Histories of Disability and Deformity (Routledge: 2006).
11 Body and Religion S. Coakley (eds), Religion and the Body (Cambridge UP: 2000).
12 Regulating Bodies M. Foucault, The Birth of Biopolitics: Lectures at the College de France, 19781979. B.S. Turner, Regulating Bodies: Essays in Medical Sociology (Routldge: 1992).
13 Student Presentations
14 Student Presentations
15 Student Presentations
16 Final

 

Course Textbooks Must readings mentioned in this information sheet.
References Micheal Foucault, History of Sexuality. Documentary and movie screening.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
14
5
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
20
Project
1
45
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
55
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
45
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
4
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
10
Project
1
10
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
13
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
145

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to scientifically examine concepts and ideas in the field of sociology; to be able to interpret and evaluate data. X
2 To be able to define classical and contemporary theories in sociology; to be able to identify the differences and similarities among those theories and to be able to evaluate them. X
3 To be able to critically use the knowledge acquired in the field of sociology X
4 To be able to plan and conduct, individually or as a member of a team, an entire sociological research process with the knowledge of methodological requirements of the field. X
5 To be able to identify and evaluate local, regional and global issues and problems. X
6 To be able to share their ideas and solutions supplemented by qualitative and quantitative data in written and oral forms. X
7 To be able to make use of other disciplines related to sociology and to have core knowledge related to those disciplines. X
8 To be able to follow developments in sociology and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1) X
9 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To have social and scholarly values and ethical principles during the collection and interpretation of data for implementation, publication, dissemination, and maintenance X
12 To acquire life long learning abilities that will enable the socially responsible application of knowledge based on their field of study to their professional and everyday lives. X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest